LegendsRacer - Legends & Bandolero Racing Forum
July 23, 2014, 11:12:31 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News:
CLICK HERE to join this forum.
 
   Home   Help Search Login Register  
Pages: [1]
  Print  
Author Topic: Stress relieving a chassis  (Read 2281 times)
j smith racing
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 3


« on: October 20, 2007, 08:28:40 PM »

No one in my area of the world does this. I would like to know what the pros and cons of doing this is. Also if some one who does this would please contact me through my email that would be great. My email is j_smith_racing@yahoo.com. Thanks for the help and info in advance.

Jimmy
Logged
justfreaky
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3643



« Reply #1 on: October 22, 2007, 01:23:53 AM »

Jimmy,
 Not sure what you mean by "stress relieving".  Huh
If you mean beefing up points of the chassis, such as suspension mounts, that recieve a lot of stress; Most of that is covered in the 600 Racing Rule Book. For the most part, the chassis must remain stock as recieved from 600 racing. Al posted a steering rack mount "how to" that may be helpful.
 If you are running SCCA ,or some other "non-traditional" organization, I would suggest checking the rules first. I know on my suspension mounts, everything will be double shear, gusseted, etc...   My car is also NOT Legends Legal. I will be running SCCA Auto-cross; and Everything that I am doing on my build, is only "Loosely" based on the Legends Car format.
 I hope that helps you some. If you are going a "non-traditional" route; PM or email me. I'll be more than happy to share what I can with you.

 Steve
Logged

Better to be hated for who you are, Than to be loved for who you are not.
thunder938
Global Moderator
Sr. Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 478



« Reply #2 on: October 22, 2007, 08:18:27 AM »

Hello, AUTOCROSS? I can run with SCCA once in a while and I was wondering about how you car handles the "Hot Laps"  at slow speed.  With less air flow around the motor what is your Oil temp?  When I have been out with the SCCA they make 5 runs back to back then a break then 5 more after the other run group goes.  Also do you just run a open rear gear?

Thanks,
Logged

Dave
justfreaky
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3643



« Reply #3 on: October 22, 2007, 11:29:48 AM »

Still building my car, so can't answer your question about oil temp.
I will be using either an open rear end or limited slip. I still haven't figured out what gear yet,

Steve
Logged

Better to be hated for who you are, Than to be loved for who you are not.
elimn8u_43
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 296



« Reply #4 on: October 22, 2007, 08:48:17 PM »

No one in my area of the world does this. I would like to know what the pros and cons of doing this is. Also if some one who does this would please contact me through my email that would be great. My email is j_smith_racing@yahoo.com. Thanks for the help and info in advance.

Jimmy

Stress reliving is when the chassis is fastened down to a frame table and the roll cage is cut clear and then re-welded. This is done to remove any twists or stresses that were applied to the chassis during inital fabrication. I am unsure of any pros or cons. Mike at CMG Motorsports would be a good person to talk to ( www.cmgmotorsports.com ). Mike is very helpful and does great work. I know that he also will stress relieve a chassis.

Geoff
Logged

JGRacing
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 846



« Reply #5 on: October 23, 2007, 10:28:00 AM »

Is it legal to cut the cage loose and reweld it?  In the rules it sounds like you can only work on the front and rear clips. 

I can see how this would help.  The chassis flexes in the turns and this keeps it from being pre-torqued in one direction.  Sort of like the difference between pre-loading a sway bar and having it in a neutral position.  I have heard of some street stock and modified builders twisitng the chassis and then welding on the cage to do this on purpose.  The problem is that you are stuck with the amount of pre-load in the car which is not something you can adjust.   
Logged
justfreaky
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3643



« Reply #6 on: October 31, 2007, 01:49:53 PM »

  While it sounds interesting; Would it really be worth the time?
 I have doubts that there would be much gain; Although the theory is interesting.
Might be worth the effort if it were an older chassis.

JMHO,
  Steve
Logged

Better to be hated for who you are, Than to be loved for who you are not.
elimn8u_43
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 296



« Reply #7 on: October 31, 2007, 07:57:01 PM »

I am unsure of the legality of this procedure. Acorrding to the rule book I would say no.  If one was looking for every last bit of speed than it might be necessary. As to the gains to be found I would need to see track times. I could see there being a slight advantage but for how long? One trip off track and I could maybe see the chassis needing to be done again. They are not real rigid and do flex a bit. My cars will stay how they are and I will make them as fast as I need them with the setup and my driving.

Geoff
Logged

Pages: [1]
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!


Google visited last this page July 22, 2014, 03:22:50 AM